Conference Coverage

For Gram-negative bacteremias, 7 days of antibiotics is enough


 

REPORTING FROM ECCMID 2018


A subgroup analysis looked at outcomes among the different sources of infection (urinary tract vs. other), whether empirical antibiotics were used, and whether the induced resistance was multdrug or non–multidrug. All of those differences hovered close to the null, but generally favored short antibiotic treatment, Dr. Yahav noted.

“I would conclude from these data that is generally safe to stop antibiotics after 7 days of covering antibiotics for Gram-negative bacteremia patients, if they are hemodynamically stable and nonneutropenic at 7 days, and have no uncontrolled source of infection,” she concluded.

The investigator-initiated study had no outside funding.

SOURCE: Yahav D et al. ECCMID 2018. Oral abstract O1120.

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