From the Journals

Study calls higher surgery costs at NCI centers into question


 

FROM JAMA NETWORK OPEN

Rectifying a ‘misalignment’

The researchers also said the findings reveal competing incentives, with commercial payers wanting to steer patients away from high-cost hospitals but health systems hoping to maximize surgical volume at lucrative referral centers.

“Value-based or bundled payment reimbursement for surgical episodes, particularly when paired with mandatory reporting on surgical outcomes, could help to rectify this misalignment,” they said.

Out-of-pocket spending wasn’t analyzed in the study, so it’s unknown how the higher prices at NCI centers hit patients in the pocketbook.

Meanwhile, non-NCI academic hospitals also had higher insurer prices paid than community hospitals, but the differences were not statistically significant, nor were differences in the study’s utilization outcomes.

Over half the patients had breast cancer, about one-third had colon cancer, and the rest had lung tumors. Patients treated at NCI centers tended to be younger than those treated at community hospitals and more likely to be women, but comorbidity scores were similar between the groups.

NCI centers, compared with community hospitals, were larger with higher surgical volumes and in more populated areas. They also had higher rates of laparoscopic partial colectomies and pneumonectomies.

Data came from the Health Care Cost Institute’s national commercial claims data set, which includes claims from three of the country’s five largest commercial insurers: Aetna, Humana, and UnitedHealthcare.

The work was funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Takvorian and Dr. Keating didn’t have any disclosures. One of Dr. Takvorian’s coauthors reported grants and/or personal fees from several sources, including Pfizer, UnitedHealthcare, and Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina.

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